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Fear not! Connected Retail in Four Steps

In a few years, commerce might look like this: since I can see online that the jeans I really want are available at the shop around the corner, I can just head out to try them on in person. Just before I go into the shop, I receive a push notification on my smartphone telling me that I can buy the shirt from my wish list immediately, with a five-euro discount. The trousers are already ready for me in the shop. The trousers and shirt both fit, but because I don’t want to take them with me right now, the shopkeeper sends them to me at no extra cost. As the shopkeeper has also looked at my purchase history and knows what I like, he also recommends a jacket to me. The jacket might not be available in-store in blue (the colour I want), but I can take a look at it on a digital signage screen. I then add the jacket to my wish list, which I can access online and in-store. I pay for the shirt and trousers with my smartphone – there’s no need for cash – and leave the shop. Everything is conveniently delivered to me at home the next day.

This is one of many scenarios currently being tested to offer clients the best possible digital and personalised customer service, even at point of sale (POS). For salespeople who haven’t yet considered the idea of connected retail, it might seem almost menacing at first glance: How are you supposed to do all of that? What aspects are relevant to me? And where should I start?

From my experience, I’d like to recommend the following steps:

1. It all starts with the CEO

The first requirement is a business leader who is completely behind the idea. Without that, it just won’t work. Developing and implementing successful connected retail solutions is a matter for the boss as this can influence the entire structure of an organization.

It’s important for all internal stakeholders to be involved in the project. A cross-channel shopping experience that combines analogue and digital elements requires a variety of skills: marketing, IT, sales, and the shopkeeper must all be brought to the table. Even the employees in the shop play a key role because only they can successfully apply the concept in practice. You therefore need to create a holistic vision from the very beginning for all participants to work toward.

2. The client is the focus of all activities

The target audience is, of course, the client. “User centricity” shouldn’t just be a buzzword, it should be self-evident. You shouldn’t begin without identifying the client’s needs and understanding their behaviours. Only by doing so can you really offer them relevant services on the appropriate POS touch points to offer interactions that create added value.

Even a simple tablet can enable added value interaction: a shopkeeper can call up additional product information for the customer and offer them additional products that aren’t currently to hand. Furthermore they can access the customer’s purchase history, which is saved on a digital customer card and offers information about the customer’s preferences.

3. Think big, but start smart

Complete your vision with an integrated view on your comprehensive touch point system, but develop new touch points step by step. Gain experience and develop it further. And, above all: avoid an off-the-rack solution that isn’t tailored to your clients.

Come up with potential solutions for small problems, develop the approaches to implementing them, and test them directly in short cycles. This iterative approach allows you to start with minor investments and safeguards against losing investments. Only when the scenario is successful as a prototype should you start with elaborate linkages of ERP-, CRM-, or till systems.

4. Don’t wait, start now

Start collecting ideas from smaller projects with your partners (retail, agency, etc.). These experiences will improve your collaboration before larger projects arise and create a uniform image for clients.

But most importantly: start now! Anyone who hesitates now will be left with nothing in the long run because, ultimately, the client will shop at the business that makes the correct information or products available at the correct time, in the correct place, and in the correct context – online and offline.

This article was also published at wuv.de.

Four Steps to a Secure E-Commerce Solution

It was possibly only a simple development error that led to a security gap at eBay in December 2015, which had the potential to intercept client passwords during the login process. The consequences of hacker attacks that take advantage of such breakdowns can be substantial – and extremely unpleasant for the user: SPAM-mail, Phishing or stolen credit cards are only a few of them.

And the eBay example shows: large players are also not spared. Up to 87 percent of all websites have medium security flaws, while 50 percent have serious security gaps. The resulting annual loss worldwide is over 400 billion US Dollars. Stores not only risk serious damage to their image with data loss. Online stores are responsible for the security of client data, and are accordingly liable for data leaks. Processes and methods that target the security of e-commerce solutions are therefore indispensable for stores. However, this is not limited to a particular phase in a project, but runs through the entire period up to the day of implementation and activation. Security is an indispensable part of the design process, part of the implementation, part of the system infrastructure and part of the operation.

Sichere E-Commerce Lösung

The following points in particular should be addressed:

Define clear requirements

It seems so mundane, but it is so important: Security begins before the project starts. And each web-store has its own requirements. In a B2B shop which charges a fee for the download of technical documents, it is of course extremely important to design very safe identification or customer registration and access protection. For a telecommunications provider that offers all of its products through a self-service portal, it is equally crucial that only the authorised user has access on the contract and invoice data. Although both examples require the implementation of access security tools, the underlying requirements are different. These must be recognised in the “Requirements-Engineering” phase, and form the basis for later implementation.

Set your standards

“Secure Coding Standards” help developers write secure codes for the web. Ideally, they fall back on safety tested frameworks. Although these preventive investments are immensely important for the security of the web application, there are still no recognised industrial standards, or a norm which defines the security of web applications. Therefore each agency or online shop must take on the responsibility itself and create its own portfolio of standards in the areas of quality assurance, security and testing.

Therefore, a few years ago we started to collect best practices or recommendations from experts, for example the Open Web Security Application Project (OWASP), so that every client does not need to search for a standard themselves, and to be able to offer truly measurable security.

Search for your security flaws

In addition, at the end of any development, we put it through a “Web Application Security Test”, which checks whether our security standards are actually adhered to. In order to do so, we work with a certified “Ethical Hacker”, a specially trained IT expert that possesses a hacker’s knowledge, but who is working for us. Additionally, this is done using various software tools (we use, for example, IBM AppScan) that simulate attacks on the application. Any suspicious reaction by the application is documented and must later be manually verified or falsified. At the end, there is a report that documents the security flaws that have been found, and provides technical assistance to help rectify the problems.

Consider each security flaw found in this phase not as an error by the programmer, but rather as a success! You’ve discovered this in the development phase. The later an error comes to light, the more expensive it is to rectify.

Conduct continuous monitoring

Factors that cannot be influenced, such as the execution environment (browser), different devices (desktop and mobile) and heterogeneous systems introduce challenges to e-commerce solutions that are not always predictable in advance. Selective security and penetration tests, in which experts (e.g., certified ethical hackers) perform targeted attack attempts, help to keep these factors in mind. Because the number of newly discovered security flaws and the ways in which software gaps can be exploited grows daily.

Moreover, there is the option to install an additional “Web Application Firewall” (WAF). This one checks every incoming request before it is passed on to the actual web application. Therefore, a WAF needs to have a complex set of rules that is customised to the particular web application. Suspicious requests are rejected immediately, and, under predefined conditions, could raise an alarm (e.g., through an email to an administrator, when 100 requests per second are sent from an IP address that contain the code for a SQL injection). As a WAF is an independent system, attack attempts do not even come close to the protected application, or the data to be protected.

Be Secure from the Beginning

The cornerstone for a secure e-commerce solution must therefore already be selected during the design – even before the software is actually used. In addition, regular testing of the software, as well as any resulting updates is unavoidable and absolutely necessary. Only then it is possible to keep the software up to date, and to ensure its safety.

This article was also published at e-commerce-magazin.de.

The Amazon Dash Button: Born in the wrong world?

The Amazon Dash Button has been hotly debated in all forms of media over the last week. Readers of Germany’s “Stern” magazine, for example, had a very clear opinion. More than 70% answered the question “What do you think about the Amazon Dash Button?” with the answer “A load of rubbish”. (Source: stern.de) Why has the response to the Amazon Dash Button, which aims to make a lot of peoples’ lives easier, been so negative?

Lots of arguments against the Dash Button

There are apparently many arguments. After its introduction on the German market, the Dash Button is being hotly debated. Data privacy advocates warn of the possible misuses of the button’s new features. Consumer advocates warn of a lack of price transparency when ordering. Usability experts raise the question of how many Dash Buttons it is sensible to have in a household and we’re wondering what actual benefits they would have for us. But where is all this aversion coming from? After all, with the Dash Button Amazon is the only company offering us a product integrated in everyday life that reflects the ideas of pervasive computing and the internet of things.

The Dash Button is currently only aimed at a specific target audience

Amazon was certainly aware that the Dash Button wouldn’t be mainstream at this stage and that it wouldn’t be every customer’s cup of tea. But we should also be clear that we are living in the world of connected commerce where the effect of the long tail is still valid because the target audience for the Dash Button may be small relatively speaking, but in absolute numbers is large enough to make the Dash Button a successful model for Amazon. Because, according to a survey by “Stern”, 10% of respondents clearly advocated the Dash Button. They said: “Great, I hate shopping in supermarkets!”

Could the real home of the Dash Button possibly be in B2B?

Another reason for the harsh criticism might be that the Dash Button was born in the “wrong world” – in the world of B2C e-commerce. Would it not actually be better suited in B2B e-commerce? Imagine a production operation. Synchronised supply chains, as well as just-in-time and just-in-sequence processes are already a reality in the area of series production. Demand impulses between manufacturers and suppliers synchronize the order and product flows here. But there are still a great number of processes that run manually.
Aside from the rigorously timed series production, there are plenty of production facilities that do not deal in large-scale production. They use machines and tools that need to be serviced at irregular intervals. Replacing and topping up auxiliary and operating materials is also performed according to need. In this scenario, the Amazon Dash Button could optimise internal logistics. If attached to the respective machines, it could be used for various materials or even maintenance services. Orders placed would go to the warehouse or requests to the servicing and maintenance service provider. Using the buttons, internal processes can be initiated and the costs allocated to the correct cost units. If equipped with NFC and the “Purchaser” code carrier, it would even be possible to assign the respective purchaser and thus ensure that only authorised individuals can submit material orders or service requests.
If we take a step back from the manufacturing industry and consider everyday office life, the Dash Button could also be of use in such environments: for example, an employee takes the last pencil or notebook from the material store and immediately orders new products by pressing a button on the shelf. Orders that have been placed can, if desired, be combined into a weekly or monthly order and the order is then automatically submitted at the specified time.
There will certainly be many scenarios like this where the Dash Button could make life a lot simpler. Without any security concerns.

The Dash Button – an exciting first evolutionary step

The Amazon Dash Button is a first mover product of its kind. However, it hasn’t necessarily been greeted with the appropriate levels of euphoria, but instead with a great deal of scepticism. “I am convinced that the Dash Button in its current form will not survive the next two years. But maybe that wasn’t even the idea behind it,” said Gerd Güldenast, Managing Director of hmmh. The Dash Button is a new generation of device that will evolve over the next few years and find new fields of application. It is a further step in the integration of connected commerce in everyday life, in order to improve and simplify life.

Maybe the Amazon Dash Button will find a wonderful home in B2B commerce.

This article was also published at internetworld.de.

China’s emerging digital power – “Integrated for Life”

China is known worldwide as the workshop of the West. But for many years, it has no longer only been known for its extreme production capacity. It exceeds repeatedly the superlatives in all the statistics and rankings, and the digital world is no exception.

Currently of the Chinese total population of 1,362,000 inhabitants, more than 600 million are already online, which is an Internet penetration rate of almost 50 per cent. It makes up 22 per cent of global internet users (1) in one country, and over 95 per cent have one or more social media accounts (2) which they also actively use, on average around 1.7 hours/day of intensive use (3), making China the undisputed social media giant.

But those are not all the superlatives. China has managed, in less than 15 years, to become the world’s second largest eTail market and become a global leader in online sales of luxury goods, which is reflected in an annual turnover from online sales of 2.9 trillion (2014). (4) And the market, seemingly unrestrained, continues to grow. Alone in the first quarter of 2015, online shopping sales once again increased by 45.2 per cent compared to last year, with an increase of 169.3 per cent (5) in mobile shopping. Recent forecasts even expect 2015 to be a turning point in B2C eCommerce with mobile becoming the dominant e-shopping channel.

Impressive figures – impressive results. Results that have attracted worldwide attention and interest in understanding the Chinese digital revolution phenomenon.

In recent years much has been written about the digital and mobile ecosystem in China, making the three Chinese Internet giants, Baidu, Alibaba and Tencent, familiar to marketers worldwide. Three companies and the three corporate visionaries behind them, Robin Li (Baidu), Jack Ma (Alibaba) and Huateng “Pony” Ma (Tencent), whose significant contributions to the digital revolution in China and China’s digital market resulted in the BAT Ecosystem (Baidu / Alibaba / Tencent). An ecosystem that has catapulted the three men not only to the forefront of digital China, but also to the top of the Forbes list of the richest Chinese.

To be a successful company in China, whether B2C or B2B, consumer or luxury goods, it is necessary be present online and to be part of this ecosystem, and this in a way which is relevant to the Chinese audience. And it needs to be understood that what is familiar and successful in the Western world is not necessarily the solution in the Far East. To succeed, an understanding of the culture, as well as the digital environment is indispensable, and not just in terms of language. An adaptation to modern Chinese lifestyle is essential and in 2015 that means: social media, eCommerce and mobile.

The Chinese rely on social media more than any other (marketing) channels, because social media channels provide an opportunity to express and exchange their views in ways not possible in other, largely government controlled, channels. Through their experience with the government, the Chinese attach great importance to the opinions of other Chinese. Recommendations from friends, from family or from business partners are in great demand. More than 66 per cent of all Chinese trust and rely on their friends, especially when it comes to buying or investment recommendations. Moreover, instant messaging systems in eCommerce provide direct and immediate contact with the customer, which can significantly increase trust and influence on the customer. The interaction in social channels between users, with KOL (Key Opinion Leaders), as well as brands, can therefore take place directly at a different level and specifically affect decisions. This means that there is nowhere worldwide with more social media addicts.

Since most Western social networks (Pinterest, Facebook, Google+, Twitter and YouTube) are blocked in China, and are difficult to reach reliably via VPN tunnel, a separate national social network has evolved over the past few years, based on the central platforms Sina Weibo and Tencent’s We chat. A social marketing network has emerged which many experts consider better, and from the marketing perspective allowing more targeted, efficient marketing measures than is the case in Western media.

With regard to e-commerce the Chinese government’s last 5-year plan (2011-2015) set a clear objective: China as a global leader in eCommerce. This was centralized and energetically launched. Government action ranged from simplified processes in the creation of eCommerce companies, including tax breaks, a significant improvement of Internet and mobile networks (4G), as well as logistics, through to innovative payment arrangements. And the goal was achieved. Chinese consumers bought more online than ever before, and the aforementioned incredible figures prove that. But again, only those who understand how the giants, Alibaba (B2B), Taobao (C2C) & Tmall (B2C), function can be successful here.

But what now makes the Chinese market so different to the rest of the world? How do these superlatives come about? And above all: how can we use these opportunities?

In a recent interview, Jack Ma, founder of Alibaba, put it in a nutshell: “In other countries eCommerce is a way to shop, in China it is a lifestyle” – and that’s exactly how eCommerce in China differs from the rest of the world.

And what applies to eCommerce also applies to other digital measures. The phenomenon in China is not the figures as such, impressively as they are, but the fact that “online” is “integrated” into the lives of 1.3 billion Chinese people, and that it is an indispensable normality – daily business.

Marketing in China can therefore only be successful if “digital” is also a matter of course, a part of everyday life. The Chinese live on the Internet; the Internet is a part of their lives. Therefore: digital channels have to be essential parts of everyday life – via desktop, tabloid, smart phone, QRCode, social media, KOL, instant messaging, Alipay etc. Every conceivable digital measure must be considered and used whenever possible in order to integrate a company and its brand into Chinese consumer’s lives.

And this is a challenge which in many cases the German/European/American headquarters cannot master in the launch of Western brands in China.

The approach “we have a marketing concept and we’ll roll it out worldwide” may work well in conditions found in many European countries or the United States. China, however, requires a different approach. In China “digital” is not just a marketing channel; it is the heart of marketing. The point where all the strands converge. Almost no campaigns come without a focus on digital. The majority of media plans for China are limited almost exclusively to digital channels to the surprise of European colleagues – and when in the exception Offline is considered, this is only part of a well thought of Offline-to-Online (and vice versa) mechanism that is the key to success here.

The seamless integration of both worlds is no longer theory but practice, which is confirmed in China, and accounts for the investments of Chinese technology companies such as Baidu, Sina and Tencent in retail business and offline business models, as increasingly highlighted in the media.

Social media has taken the key role in successful campaigns in modern China.

At a time when (from the Chinese perspective completely outdated) social media in the Western world is celebrated as the great innovation in customer communications and user dialogue – social media in China already provides all-purpose instruments and a central campaign framework and already offers, alongside marketing, a direct shopping channel, payment terminal and shipping tracking in a single application in the hands of the buyer.

And that is not the end of it. Almost every week China’s digital players put new innovations and technology into the race, which are then adopted in the shortest time and integrated into daily life by an extremely inquisitive open-minded society, eager for innovation and technical highlights,. Innovations often need months if not years to find widespread recognition in the Western world, whilst in China they spread at a record rate across all age and income groups.

But China is not only a market of giants. In addition to the known, previously mentioned players, there is still plenty of space for thousands of niche players (which often have more than 500,000 active users) who, through innovation and customer focus, satisfy the still unsatisfied hunger of Early Adapters. The need for the integration of digital applications in daily life is immeasurable and so there are now digital gadgets available for every imaginable need – which often make life much easier. It is already normal to pay at vending machines with a smart phone, and in daily life, the use of taxis or bill payment without apps and with cash is almost impossible – or at least considered obsolete and primitive.

Applications like QR Code or ibeacon, which in Germany are found at most as gimmicks in technology fairs or as a guide in innovative museums, are in China’s 1st and 2nd Tier cities essential instruments to ensure communication between advertisers and their consumers.

For those involved in advertising and sales, these developments are, in many respects, a challenge. If it is already a challenge to keep up-to-date with these new features, then the second step is to successfully use these new innovations and know how to integrate them accordingly in the communication mix as well as in sales and distribution processes. An outstanding example of this is the development of WeChat with regard to virtual money transactions as well as the use of smart phones as the dominant eCommerce channel of the future.

However, these developments present Western companies in particular often unexpected obstacles. To get an overview and find the right approach often involves high unplanned costs for highly localized communication and distribution concepts as well as the corresponding implementation itself. This often leads to global campaigns being locally adapted with only limited budgets and then often with limited success. However, anyone who is willing to invest and exploit the potential of the Chinese digital playing field is rewarded, and the Western brands which have taken a local approach are rewarded with surprisingly strong market positions.

The secret to success here is usually a strong local team with the right local partners, openness to new technologies and to some extent for the West completely unknown players and platforms, as well as anticipating a corresponding flexibility in the implementation, especially when it comes to global guidelines, IT standards and consent. Here, the Western world too often lags behind developments in the Far East, and time plays a very important role in China. China is in constant change and development, and is clearly ahead of the West in many areas. In particular, the digital environment is developing rapidly and requires of all who want to be involved successfully, the highest speed.

True to the mantra of the Digital Experts in China: “Execute fast, or die.”

(1) http://www.internetlivestats.com/internet-users/china/
(2) which explains why the number of social media users exceeds the number of Internet users
(3) Source: NBS of China, CNNIC, Tencent, MIIT of China, Global Webindex: wearesocial.com;
(4) http://www.iresearchchina.com/views/6484.html;
(5) http://www.iresearchchina.com/views/6484.html; http://www.iresearchchina.com/views/6449.html