Is programmatic advertising better than Clooney?

Why creativity remains a human affair but can still benefit from programmatic advertising

The coming of the a. P. (after Programmatic) era has sparked a new debate on relevance: the consumer is becoming more critical and thus less susceptible to advertising messages: So instead of one message for all, target groups are now being addressed specifically: “Buy our product, it is exactly tailored to your needs. Yes, we mean you. No one else needs the product as much as you do.” On the other hand, companies paid five million US dollars for a 30-second advert during this year’s Super Bowl. Pure scattergun, one message for all. So who is it who produces relevance – intelligent machines or creative people? The answer is: both. In this debate, as so often, there is no either-or, because maximum relevance can only be achieved by technology bosses and creative directors jointly.

Programmatic advertising is one way to create relevance. But programmatic advertising is no substitute for creative excellence. Even personalised advertising needs the structure of a central message, for example in the form of a slogan that is taken up again and again over a lengthy period and several campaigns: “You’re not you when you’re hungry” – the Snickers slogan remains memorable because all target groups can identify with it on a basic level. If someone in your circle of acquaintances acts like a diva, what immediately comes to mind is the slogan from the advert – that is relevance. A fitting testimonial can also be the starting point for a successful campaign. When George Clooney looks casually into the camera and gives – even more casually – his best “What else?” it is probably also relevant to tea drinkers. The message in this example is less bold but no less effective. The coffee capsules represent savoir-vivre, confidence and coolness.

When the general story-telling is cut and dried, programmatic creation of the campaign can provide a strong stimulus for the second phase. Depending on the target group, the slogan “You’re not you when you’re hungry” could be re-enacted with different testimonials and contexts: sports fans see a Snickers spot on sports news pages or on TV during Wimbledon, when John McEnroe smashes his tennis racket to bits after an umpire’s decision – then, after one bite from the chocolate bar, he becomes Roger Federer and is on his best behaviour. George Clooney no longer just drinks his coffee in plush hotels but also in the office, at the hairdresser’s or in the theatre. What is important is that core ideas and personalised variations are in accordance with each other, both stylistically as well as regards content: the core message should always remain unchanged.

In addition to the big consumer brands, brands with specialised target groups and products benefit particularly from programmatic advertising, because it enables them to avoid high scatter loss. Even B2B enterprises use the personalised approach. Here too, however: An algorithm cannot replace creative input. Without a good central idea I believe there is absolutely no point in varying a couple of text components and pictures in a banner. Boring advertising, even personalised, is still boring.

Relevance has many facets. It can be produced by people and machines – the best solution is for creative people to do the preliminary work and for intelligent machines to go the extra mile. It only starts getting really exciting when ideas people and advertisers with enthusiasm for technology sit down at the table together. Experience shows that things don’t always go smoothly straight away and, particularly, that the whole can only work when both sides show mutual respect and understanding for the other’s work. The results which arise from this, however, are worth it every time!

Creativity and technology, with the client at its center

In an interview with Advertiser.it Sara Baroni, Managing Director Plan.Net Italia, talks about creativity and innovation and gives insights into the daily work life of the Italian agency.

The Mobile World Congress 2017: Evolution instead of Revolution – And Not Such a Bad Thing Either

More than 2,300 exhibitors from 208 countries and over 108,000 visitors (+7%); the organisers are very pleased with another record year. In brief, therefore, the outcome may be summed up as follows: No real surprises and as expected, the most important themes this year were artificial intelligence, combined with voice control services (‘Shy Tech’), Internet of things and ‘smart homes’ – whereby the boundaries are naturally very fluid. On the other hand, every possible virtual and mixed reality experience is pretty much par for the course at the exhibition. The strong presence of connected cars has been a surprise to me and robots made a discreet appearance. However, we will not be talking about any breakthroughs here for a long time yet. In this regard, some of us expected a bit more.

Cars are Increasingly Stealing the Show from Smartphones

The fact that the car is becoming more and more of a ‘mobile device’ was blatantly obvious at the Mobile World Congress (MWC) 2017. Therefore, it was interesting that all the exhibitors appeared to directly pin this theme, as well as their hopes, onto the new 5G network standard. In all the vehicle presentations, 5G was the most prominent topic and quite clearly what caught the eye of the public. However, although 5G had already been a massive theme at the exhibition the previous year, we must practice a little patience for a while longer, before we can perhaps whizz through mobile Internet in 2020 at tenfold LTE speed. The connected car shall then most certainly – just like other domains (e.g. mobile television) – receive a real boost once more. Many new services have indeed already been developed in this area so far; for example, the ‘in-car payment’ services emerging from the cooperation between Jaguar and Shell. Here, a payment system is directly installed in the car as an app. This really makes sense these days and does not require 5G for a satisfactory user experience.

A further challenge consists of ensuring a rapid network and first-rate services in both directions, meaning content and services being conveyed as seamlessly as possible throughout the user‘s journey. This is because all the new things on offer, whether connected cars, smart home uses or new app services, can only unleash their potential, if they are networked and configured with each other. Therefore, it is no wonder that the race to determine the key user ID began a long time ago. Along with the major tech companies, automobile manufacturers now also have their own ideas about this – e.g. the seat ID on starting up; or they will at least have already let the engines warm up. Time will tell whether this is enough for them to get one step ahead.

Connected Products everywhere

The various networked products on offer were exactly as expected. For example, a whole range was presented by Bosch – from ‘BML050’, a high-precision scanner for interactive laser projection, which can also be installed in toy figures; to the ‘Spin Master Zoomer Chimp’, a toy chimpanzee with lifelike actions. Finally, the smallest of the new technologies must certainly be introduced. Arguably the most important connection currently in the smart homes network is voice-activated access, ideally equipped with intelligent bot systems. It was clear here that Amazon Alexa and Google Home did not want to miss out on this on the market.  Correspondingly, it was possible to discover the first alternative systems at MWC: e.g. NUGU, SONY Agent, or Aristotle Hub by Mattel with Qualcomm-Power, for the networked children’s bedroom of the future. This abundance of new products will revive trade, which will ultimately benefit the user. Decisive for the success of individual devices, however, will mainly be the infrastructure they are networked with, which all the major players particularly avail themselves of: search engines, shopping portals, music libraries and smart home interfaces. Firstly, a voice-activated system can render these platforms powerful.

Virtual Reality: Increasingly Part of the Furniture

This year, VR- and AR headsets surely had one of the most stand-out profiles at the exhibition. In the VR domain, it was new accessories that were mainly presented: wireless systems or the VR glove for an even more immersive experience, like the HTC Vive Tracker, which we had already hotly anticipated. New VR installations on the Samsung stand also tempted visitors, although no longer in droves, as had been the case the previous year. Virtual reality has finally become a reality in 2017. There were no more big surprises.

On the other hand, it was interesting that many exhibitors, e.g. Intel, had integrated the Microsoft HoloLens into their presentation concept. This did not exactly take one’s breath away, but felt consistently appropriate and on point and most certainly gave a final touch to the product presentations.

And Phone Highlights?

Yes indeed, there were of course other hardware novelties too – this theme had indeed faded almost into the background for a few years at MWC and on this occasion again, there were practically no surprises, aside from the Nokia 3310. It was quite absurd, the amount of attention given to this. The retro-mobile phone is rather a peripheral issue. Perhaps, however, it is the fact that manufacturers, whether LG (G6), HUAWEI (P10/plus) or BlackBerry (KeyOne) all actually offer great big beautiful smartphones with more and more amazing cameras. In the end, they all look pretty much the same anyway; although brands seem to primarily lean towards Apple and Co in terms of design. Overall, the devices are of course higher performance: evolution rather than revolution is also the motto here.

Meaningful Evolution

Meanwhile, some journalists and commentators complained that no major innovations made an appearance this year. Yes, that is certainly true and it is of course great fun to report on trailblazing products. However, instead of calling for another new wave of technology, we should take time to assess the existing solutions and marketing possibilities for ourselves as users and if they suit us, to apply them for our own purposes with sense and understanding. As an example, take virtual reality: in the past year, marketable devices were launched for the first time. Users and brands alike very quickly started the ball rolling and each recognised great potential in it. As a result, VR systems are increasingly landing up on the wish lists of technophile customers and correspondingly, ranges are slowly growing. At the same time, many brands have transformed the momentum of the past year into concrete project development and work on the respective products, both in the B-to-B and B-to-C domains. VR projects are frequently cost-intensive and time-consuming. All parties involved are thus responsible for circumventing this by using the available resources.

Great, if the next big thing is not all the rage already.

Mobile World Congress 2017 – Barcelona calling.

As digital specialists we get to work in an exciting environment. New, technology-driven topics are part of everyday life for us. Trade fairs like CES, MWC etc. are a Mecca for innovation. For what’s important. For relentless progress. The most important event on the calendar for all mobile technology enthusiasts kicks off once more today with the Mobile World Congress (MWC). Just like last year I will rush through the halls – searching for new ideas, the most exotic, exciting gadgets, system solutions and digital products as well as, of course, interesting discussions. Face-to-face and fully analogue.

I am expecting that the MWC will focus on the following five trends:

  • Chatbots and Artificial Intelligence
  • Virtual, Augmented and Mixed Reality
  • Internet of Things and Smart Homes
  • Shy Techs
  • Robots

Many of these topics featured prominently at the trade fair last year too. What will be exciting is to see where the technologies are heading in the future – and when they will become commonplace in our everyday lives.

1) Chatbots and Artificial Intelligence

Chatbots are an exciting example of how a rather minor trend topic – since such a simple bot is ultimately constructed relatively quickly – develops into something of much greater relevance. Chatbots fulfil the wishes of consumers to quickly and easily access information that is tailored precisely to their personal needs and is available whenever and wherever. However, the simple interface alone will by no means be enough. The systems only become powerful when the accuracy of the responses is optimised by CRM, product and other database connections. A chatbot has to be able to address communication histories with the customer and learn constantly. It will be exciting to see which system solutions will be offered at MWC and which environments will be used to demonstrate chatbots. A social media messenger is ultimately just one of many possible applications.

2) Virtual, Augmented and Mixed Reality

It is really overwhelming to see the hardware that has been launched on the market in this field over the past year. Virtual reality became reality in 2016. New gadgets have spurred our imagination and given us a foretaste of the future. No question. These exciting times are set to continue with providers like Samsung having already announced many new developments that are to be presented at MWC. Sensational opportunities are waiting to be discovered in selected areas. But even if companies like Oculus, HTC etc. are recording increased sales in the area of True, that is to say fully immersive, VR, really wide-scale availability is not yet achievable. It is the brand stagings at the POS or at trade fairs that are the most exciting at present from a marketing perspective. In terms of certain aspects anyhow.
Augmented reality has also not made the major breakthrough as yet. Even if this was promised by so many owing to a short-lived but fierce battle with Pokémon Go. Most players had probably not activated the camera anyway when playing. And HoloLens also is primarily a great problem solver for a couple of individual application scenarios – for example in the framework of training measures. The focus at the moment though is still on “one-offs”.
However, I am really excited to see whether a real augmented reality breakthrough can be achieved here at MWC (or at an upcoming Apple Keynote?). The usability of these functions from a system perspective can all of a sudden provide the breakthrough in terms of real availability and exciting services. In a time when basically all information is already provided with a spatial coordinate, this information can also be linked with the camera function. Additional information on locations, on a person you are talking to or individual products as basic features – now that would be something!

3) Internet of Things & Smart Homes

No question. Anything that can be wired will be wired. CES and MWC will also compete in this sense for the most amazing products. But what else is left other than to wire hairbrushes? All will be revealed… With all of this absurdity, however, we should not forget that there are definitely exciting applications in the area of home automation. There’s no going back once the wireless speakers are established in your living room. And if you’re not sure if you switched off the lights, the oven or the hob, a quick look at the smart home app will ease your mind. Whether or not you are already signed up for all of this: just say you notice that toilet paper stocks are running low and can order supplies on the spot, then the entire household will benefit. These functions and others will increasingly – and, quite understandably – find their way into our homes.

4) Shy Techs

At the end of the day, most people simply want an easier working environment and a seamless living environment. This is the case even if they are not technology nerds. The term Shy Tech seems to aptly describe such people. No keyboards, not even monitors are absolutely necessary to control functions or retrieve information. Amazon has taken an initial giant step in this direction with “Echo”. Google Home is set to follow and Apple is planning to continue developing Siri, probably more likely with the iPhone as hardware than with its own loudspeaker. Great, if everything works smoothly. An army of clever bots will support us comprehensively.
At this point at the latest, a little reflection is always needed: where will the data actually be stored, where can I find information about this? Can the practice of law really keep up if product development is entering new grey areas or completely uncharted waters every day? Developing ideas and content for these systems is certainly the right thing to do. But maybe we should start off with cookery recipes and not immediately have medical records read aloud to us by these voice control systems. In any case, I am expecting to see every conceivable application at MWC. It will be interesting!

5) Robots

If Alexa and Siri learn to walk in the course of the digital evolution then robots will probably be the final outcome. Already last year you could use a smartphone to roll small robotic balls through an empty apartment and use integrated cameras to keep an eye on the apartment even from the café or play with the cat. Smartphone-based control is likely to stay, but the robots inside the rolling balls will probably unveil themselves as fully-fledged robots for use in the home. I am very excited to see what innovations will emerge in this area. Maybe I’ll meet “Kuri”, the small Bosch robot, or one of its fellow species. Apart from the quite legitimate question that Bill Gates recently asked as to whether taxes would not have to be levied on commercially used robots in the future to compensate for any impending decline in revenues from income tax, robots will probably become established somewhat slowly in our private everyday lives.
After all, I still prefer it when I can ask a human for directions in the shopping centre as opposed to a robot. And I am not alone in this. That’s why we have to take a step back from all of the euphoria that surrounds trade fairs like MWC. Our goal is to support our customers optimally in ensuring they are successful and equipped for the future. We keep an eye on all trends, analyse, make recommendations and advise. It’s not about being the fastest at implementing new technologies, rather finding the best and most suitable solution for the customer. Even if this sometimes means initially forsaking the latest hype.

More information and pictures from the Mobile World Congress can be found on Tumblr: sp-url.com/correspondent

Digital transformation – In the end it’s all down to the individual

When companies contemplate digital transformation, they usually concern themselves first of all with business models, technologies, platforms and processes. This is not wrong but yet not enough. That’s because companies need to focus on the individual if digital transformation is to be successful for them. She or he is the greatest hurdle and at the same time the best opportunity in this process. And this applies in two respects: on the one hand, companies have to understand the impact of digitalisation on the needs and behaviours of their own customers and future target groups. This is the only way that digital offers, platforms and communication can develop, which are relevant for current and future users and thus have the prospect of success. On the other hand, change projects can only be sustainable if the company’s own employees understand the effects of digitalisation on the company and the sector and support the corresponding changes required.

Admittedly, we receive private messages via newsfeeds or from Facebook, we stream films, music or TV series when and where we want. We communicate via social networks and messenger, book travel online, do our shopping over the net and control the heating via an app. Progressive and all-pervasive digitalisation has changed our everyday lives – and is continuing to do so at an increasing pace. Whereas yesterday we were still fascinated by being able to order groceries online, now we get news of political upheaval via Twitter, meanwhile tomorrow we will of course use Echo to order toilet tissue. We are experiencing and witnessing change in practically every area of life. When it comes to our job and our own company, however, the attitude and perception of many people change.

From onlooker to stakeholder

Notwithstanding the fact that digitalisation affects almost every sector, managers and employees can nevertheless be found at all hierarchical levels who still quote various reasons why this topic is not at all relevant in their sector or professional life – regardless, incidentally, of industry and age. Complete rejection, major scepticism or the general dread of change – especially change processes – is only too human. Anyone who shuts out this aspect and believes that digital transformation can be decreed “top down” – in the truest sense – will in all probability fail.

Companies that want to successfully master digital transformation must encourage understanding of the transformation among their employees as well as a willingness and desire to change. The switch from onlooker to stakeholder is essential.

The buzzword “digital transformation” very rarely means anything definite to employees. The word is too unwieldy and at the same time can be interpreted in any number of ways. It is considerably easier to approach the issue by asking concrete questions and communicating and discussing these openly. How is media usage by our customers changing as a result of digital transformation? How are their needs and purchasing patterns changing? Are new target groups emerging and what makes them tick? Is there a significant demand for our products in new channels and platforms? Do we need to reassess the role and mix of communication and sales channels? How are our existing competitors dealing with the new situation? Where are new competitors emerging, who perhaps offer just part of our value chain but at a previously unknown level of quality? It is only when answers can be found collectively to these questions that change processes in the company can be justified in an objective and transparent manner. If decisive changes are the result of analysis, all employees have to know the reasons for this. Digital transformation can only be successful for companies if they take the anxieties and any reservations of their employees seriously.

Digital expertise you can touch

Gather together the employees you need in the first step to initiate the transformation, preferably using different training formats. Only by experiencing something in practice and trying it out is it possible to properly grasp a subject. This is true for mobile payment options for your own company in the same way as for deliberations on introducing agile forms of project management. For example, introduce new tools and approaches using concrete use cases in a two-day workshop – with external support too. Visit start-ups together from outside of the sector also and test and try out technologies in practice. Exchange information with digital natives on their media usage and consumer behaviour. The aim is to allow things and developments to become touchable, tangible and therefore intelligible so as to identify the opportunities and challenges for your own company. Jointly elaborating specific goals and visions in workshops can also be helpful to dispel any trepidations that may arise from any sense of lack of expertise. Play planning games with a very practical orientation and, wherever possible, avoid using jargon. Buzzword bingo is counter-productive in everyday life. The draft of a digital strategy for your company can result at the end of the introductory and conceptualisation phase. This is of course just a first draft that has to be substantiated and revised in detail. But you will get a collective view of exactly how the concept could look in practice.

It is also clear: once the strategy has been developed and fundamental decisions made, these will not remain correct and valid for years to come. Only one thing is certain: the next update will definitely come. The iteration should therefore be planned in as a principle from the outset and be made a permanent feature of the strategy and reflection process.

Internal communication as a key success factor

Active and open communication must therefore be an integral part of all processes. Include employees – in decisions, new ideas and strategies. The feeling of being taken seriously and having a say, at least in one’s own field, can break down resistance. So that ultimately everyone in the company understands and is convinced that change is a constant part of the new work environment.

Digital Creation: The art of concentration or the return of pragmatism

Not so long ago a digital creative approached me and wanted to discuss a problem with me: “When I get a briefing I have absolutely no idea where to begin. There are so many possibilities. And platforms. And innovations. Somehow you can make everything – and nothing”. I understand him completely. That is precisely why, on the one hand, being a creative in 2017 is really difficult. On the other hand, exactly why it is so exciting.

And, of course, a lot of things used to be simpler. You settled down with a couple of sheets of white paper, copious amounts of coffee and maybe a packet of cigarettes and  “used your imagination”. Created familiar formats like 35-second TV spots from nothing, or filled a double page in a magazine with new contents. You wrote ten articles and the Creative Director had the in hindsight comparatively easy task: he had to decide which of them was the funniest, most surprising or most amazing. Then you scribbled ten notices, edited them and repeated the process. In those days everything was prepared fairly quickly and you knew that it would be turned on its head later.

Today it’s all different.

In-depth knowledge, huge amounts of research, a seamless strategy, intelligent data- aggregation and, based on this, precise target group segmentation; nowadays, these often seem to be the basic prerequisites before you can even begin to think about a headline. At least, that’s the theory. And it does make complete sense. In this – admittedly exaggerated – form it is, however, extremely costly, both in terms of expense and time. Above all, though, one factor is often forgotten, which hasn’t changed since the “good old days”: healthy understanding of people and a creative talent. Of course, as a creative one should be up to date with current technology and platforms and ideally be able to use them. Close cooperation with media and strategy is also absolutely essential. But a good idea is still a good idea today. Only the basis on which it can be developed has changed. New formats want to be fulfilled and technical possibilities exploited.

A solution to the problem or a solution looking for a problem?

An innovative, creative task is characterised, by definition, by providing a new solution for an existing problem. At a time in which, however, many things are happening “because they can”, the tables are turned in many instances. Today there are new solutions and to a certain extent problems for these have first to be found. For example: only seven years ago there was no iPad. Then suddenly there it was and agencies and customers alike asked themselves what effect this technical achievement would have on their business. Suddenly the supply was determining demand. Almost overnight creatives were forced to invent useful applications for a new device. It’s just as if the wireless were discovered today and tomorrow copywriters are having to write radio spots.

The principle of trial and error

So the only thing we can do is just try things out – because they are there and because we can, because it’s fun and not because we feel forced into it. Whether it’s VR, Chat-Bots, Facebook Live or Alexa. We should transfer this innovative gold-rush fever, which the tech start-ups demonstrate, to our own work. We should allow ourselves to be infected by this almost childlike impulse to play in this fascinating period and try things out. And if something doesn’t work, well that’s no bad thing. Then we just have to do things better, change them – or leave them and do something else. It sounds banal but it is nothing other than prototyping. Quickly changing something to test whether it works.

Of course there are no comparison values and no market research can answer our acquired urge to know whether something is right or wrong. But it doesn’t have to because nowadays the most important test group of all tells us whether it likes something – the consumers themselves.

Four tips for successful product content

Many e-commerce strategies focus on excellence in design and optimum tailoring of shops for the mobile world, exciting campaigns as well as media planning that will attract a great deal of attention and ensure extensive coverage. There is no doubting that all of this is important. Yet even the best planned marketing euro is wasted if the product detail page that customers eventually reach at the end of their journey throws up more questions than answers. What are the product features? What does the material look like exactly? Are the details correct?

The user is often just presented with the most basic information: height, width, depth, size, material. Such information would not be adequate to sell a product in brick-and-mortar retailing. We want to experience products and grasp them in the truest sense of the word. And this is precisely where a large gap exists all too often – despite all connected commerce efforts – between store-based and digital retail or between aspiration and reality. Carelessly designed product detail pages – and we are not referring here to usability or design, rather the main product information – are the final blow to the successful outcome of the user journey. No purchase is made, because the customer simply does not find adequate information about the particular product. An even more bitter pill for the online retailer is if the customer decides to purchase – despite poor or inadequate information – but then is not satisfied on receiving the goods. Expensive returns, negative reviews and dissatisfied customers are the result. We therefore recommend following the four steps outlined below to optimise the product content and thus prevent precisely these negative consequences.

1.    Address the topic of content early on

Preparing high-quality and unique product content takes time: time for coordinating internal processes, time for consulting with manufacturers and time for preparing, enriching or refining the content. Texts have to be written, attributes maintained and photos taken as well as edited. These processes have to be done and dusted before good content can be produced quickly in large quantities. In the meantime, you avoid the error of relying on a service provider just before the go-live that, despite not knowing your product range, promises to caption 100,000 products virtually overnight and enrich them with attributes. This cannot go well. You should therefore place the topic of product content among the top items on your agenda.

2.    Do not rely on the manufacturer

“We will get the product details from the manufacturer” is a widely held belief. Yet many manufacturers only have very basic product content at their disposal and sometimes not even any product photos as yet. Moreover, you have to transfer the information from the manufacturer to your system. Non-standardised interfaces and different formats often require laborious manual reworking and end up costing you time. And don’t forget: the same manufacturer will be supplying its product details to different retailers – your competitors. This is far removed from unique content.

3.    Invest in unique content

Product content is primarily intended for the visitors to your shop. It should inform and encourage the visitor to make a purchase. But getting to the product detail page is a long journey. That’s why good editorial product content has to be prepared optimally for the search engine. Search engine-optimised content promotes the right keywords, is detectable by bots and above all is unique. Duplicate content is penalised in the rankings by Google and others. An investment in unique content is therefore an investment in the performance of your shop. Regardless of whether you have product texts created in-house or by an agency, you invest time in sensible briefings, engage authors who are competent in the most important SEO requirements and familiarise the authors with your product range.

4.    Think user-centred – not in channels

The mantra of “media-neutral content” applied for years. The same product content should work in all channels. However, the quest for the smallest common denominator results in content that is then suboptimal in all channels. Print content has to be prepared differently than web content. Product detail pages accessed on mobile phones have to look different to detail pages opened on tablets or on the desktop PC. While customers perform extensive searches on the desktop at home and check every detail, they primarily want to see all key details at first glance on their smartphone when on the move. At the end of the day, what is important is to generate the ideal content in each case for the user to suit their respective usage situation. Therefore, take on board the views of your customers and answer the question as to when which product information is interesting for whom and where. “Media-neutral” content on the other hand patronises your customers.

Top-class product content is not rocket science and – admittedly – not exactly the topic the CDO or Digital Manager will tackle first. But experience shows that it is what concerns your customers. The topic has therefore deserved more attention.

This article was also published on internetworld.de.

Trends 2017: Austria

In 2017 topics like programmatic advertising, business intelligence, data management, data security, mobile commerce and data-driven marketing per se will gain in importance. That’s not new. In reality, we already have to master all these areas and have to do “our homework” next year to drive and consolidate our knowledge and competences. Within the developments in the communication industry, especially in the digital field, we notice following main trends, which will more and more decide about “top or flop”:

  • Responsive Content
    2016 was the year of native advertising and content strategies – the focus was definitely on “CONTENT”. Online websites are (in most cases) responsive concerning the layout. BUT in the ideal case also the content adapts itself to the mobile device. There are many opportunities to improve usability and effectiveness of communication, with the background of the changing media usage. New ways and strategies to create and spread content successfully will gain a meaning – in this case in bits and pieces and not in 30‘‘.
  • Visuality & Iconic Turn
    Our world is becoming more and more “illustrated” – our environment is full of icons, pictures, videos. In the age of information overload we have to process information faster and more contextual. This means for the communication industry: Pictorial language and new ways of visualization will continue to be an important success factor.
  • Structuring data – Reducing complexity 
    Data management, data security, data-driven marketing, business intelligence – 2017 structured data will be more important than ever before. For all innovative systems handling data-driven marketing the ability of structuring data in a meaningful way is essential and inevitable. Making a complex world more simple – for everyone (customers & companies)!
  • Transition between Apps & Web 
    On the smartphone, we spend most of our time in apps, not in the browser. But marketers still focus their communication measures on the Web. 2017 priorities will shift. For example, there will be important questions about how to make the transition between app and web better – deeplinks and other gadgets can quickly become powerful marketing tools, especially in the area of mobile commerce.
  • Messenger Marketing
    Whatsapp and Facebook Messenger are the most important chat programmes and apps for communicating. Facebook is currently starting to monetize the Messenger, Whatsapp could follow soon. In 2017 mobile marketers must be there, where the target group is – and this is in any case also the messenger. It is time to enter into a dialogue on Facebook Bots.
  • Mobile Video content 
    In the meanwhile, the biggest “video problem” is solved for mobile devices. The size of videos is hardly an obstacle in LTE times. Videos are popular in all (personal) environments – with the strong tendency to live videos. Mobile video marketing must already be ensure in the production process that videos can be consumed in all living situations. Subtitling or a suitable call-to-action can be a way out.

Nevertheless we do not want to forget about the real communication trends, which we do not find in the media every day, but with which trend researchers are mainly concerned with. Digital detox, the non-existing disruption and related retro-trend, Postgenderism, (finally) customer-oriented NFC solutions and innovative e-governmental services will also be increasingly focussed in 2017.

Trends 2017 from the Middle East

TECHUCATION THANKS TO AR & VR

Technology and education is on the rise, with companies like IBM and Apple working hand in hand to release Watson Element in a bid to help teachers gain insights into individual learning behaviors. In Dubai, the vision of Sheikh Mohammad Bin Rashid Al Maktoum to provide “NEW GENERATIONS with the skills needed for the future” is prompting VR giant, Samsung, to seek content cooperation partners like Serviceplan to create VR experiences in both the classroom and the workplace. Brands can take advantage of AR and VR by creating content, instead of merely looking at devices to push content through. This will be a tall order for VR and AR content creators, as International Data Corporation (IDC) reports that the augmented and virtual reality market for the Middle East and Africa will grow robustly over the next five years, projecting annual growth rates of more than 100 per cent by 2020.

REALTIME INFLUENCER MARKETING

Realtime Influencer Markting will now, more than ever, require brands to slowly give up creative control. With new social tools like Facebook Live and Instagram Stories now available to supplement Snapchat, transparency between brands and influencers, as well as authenticity in influencer content, will become more apparent in 2017. Brands will want to see immediacy in content, regardless of its ephemeral nature, but will, in turn, require statistics behind it. This means shorter lead-times to conceptualize and create content, giving influencers more control of the pieces they publish. Consequently, influencers will start choosing to collaborate only with brands that allow them to stay true to their personalities, and to maintain the core of their online following. With real-time now invading our social spaces, influencer authenticity will replace influencer popularity. Brands will come to realize that fame does not necessarily equate to quality, and that quality, served to a smaller, more targeted audience will hold more value and influence. Other, more established brands will revert to celebrities over mere influencers, if only to defy the already dizzying predominance of so-called “social voices”. Dubai’s clever use of Sharuk Khan in its latest promotional film is one such example.

ATTENTION ECONOMY AND THE 5 SECONDS OF OPPORTUNITY

Today, attention is a rising commodity in itself, as smartphones have left humans with such short attention spans that there is only a 3-5 second window of opportunity to grab the consumer’s attention. This change in consumer behavior places increased value on content marketing with short video at its core. In this new landscape, social platforms are assuming the role traditionally occupied by broadcast media. Brands and marketers should start looking into innovative content that would make their platforms more and more relevant to the already hooked Arab audience. Live video, for one, is now being experimented with by brands (primarily from owned events to amplify reach) and this will be utilized even more in 2017.

Trends 2017: Belgium

To achieve the best results possible for the brands that we serve, and as part of our quest to embrace emerging marketing and communication movements, we need to take a closer look at some social trends.

Looking forward, the thing that strikes us in particular is a general sense of “harmonious contradiction”. There are two intriguing, big and bold contradictions going on which brands should try to understand and appropriate.

Tactile vs virtual & artificial

At the beginning of December, for the first time in history, the amount of money spent on vinyl records in the UK overtook the amount spent on digital downloads.

“We have a new generation buying vinyl, lots of teenagers and lots of people under 25, who now want to buy their favourite artists on vinyl and have something a bit more tangible, a bit more collectible. People have become keen to support their favourite artists by buying into that ownership concept. It’s very difficult to demonstrate your love of an artist if you don’t have something to hold on to,” said Kim Bayley, chief executive of the Entertainment Retailers Association recently.

In a digital world, consumer preference can indeed be influenced by sensory marketing tactics: think about the combined potential of sight, touch, sound, taste, and smell.

Even while anxieties are expressed about the impact of robots on the way we work, and the kinds of jobs that exist, millions of people have already adopted home robots. Take the Echo: it has already captured imaginations and hooked its owners on how easy it makes ordering a takeaway, or never running low on washing powder.

Brands needs to ensure that their technology/services can be linked in some way to this new kind of central domestic technology.

Local vs. e-tailing on the doorstep

It’s becoming increasingly clear that living a healthy life and thriving means putting as much care and thought into our relationship with food, as we do into our personal relationships. The best place to start working on a closer relationship with the food we eat is at local farmers’ markets and by buying from local food producers – and of course this is also true in fashion, furniture etc. Brands can tap into the trend towards these lifestyle choices by playing a facilitating role starting to allocate areas for community gardens, urban farms and local entrepreneurship.

Every day, a new “kit on your doorstep” initiative is launched, whether it be a meal in a kit, an outfit in a kit, or the myriad other options available. Thousands of cardboard boxes land on urban and rural doorsteps every month, containing all the elements needed to create a home-cooked dinner. Like frozen food or the microwave oven, meal kits may be a kitchen innovation that fundamentally changes how people cook at home. The cookbook author Mark Bittman told the New York Times: “It’s cooking. It’s not shopping and it’s not planning and in a way it’s not thinking, but it is cooking.”

While many question the ecological footprint of these services, brands can play a vital role in logistics and packaging innovation, offering smart recycling. Brands can help kitchens and their appliances to become smarter, and make cooking more intuitive and complex meals more accessible.

Generation Z

The first members of Generation Z will turn 21 in 2017, marking their transition from society’s teenagers to fully fledged consumers, and as such their influence will mark a tipping point for retailers. The way most retailers do business nowadays will be turned on its head, as this generation is made up of free thinkers, and sceptical when it comes to brands. They interact primarily on social media channels, simultaneously across several of them, and spend little to no time on brand platforms.

As more and more social channels integrate social shopping, brands should design even more specific content to entice this emerging group of consumers, who will be drawn to social selling storytelling. Instagram’s shoppable photo strategy is only a faint indicator of what is to come, and what will be easily adopted by these mobile natives.

Whereas platformless retail may still be considered a trend, conversational commerce will fully blossom in 2017. Chatbots and apps are now a retail tool that can boost business and increase customer service in a way that is satisfying for Generation Z.

The daily use of technology comprising chat, messaging or other natural language interfaces, short circuits the brand-to-consumer loop, facilitating “conversations” between people, brands or services, and making it possible to use a device – notably a smartphone – to ask questions, place orders and get advice.

Brands that are early adopters of this kind of commerce will certainly appeal to Generation Z, and are likely to see these consumers spending their first salaries with them rather than with traditional e-tailers. Tangible benefits of WhatsApp social commerce:

  • Instant notification of messages being read.
  • No queuing – 30-minute response time.
  • No precious time wasted on explaining a fault or your specific need; a simple picture will do.

By linking to a CRM system, not only can brands facilitate direct sales, but track customer lifecycle too. We all remember SuitSupply in the Netherlands – the cool initiative and pilot case that resulted in an additional channel for commerce.

H&M’s bot suggests various outfits to users and provides the opportunity to purchase through the bot’s messaging platform. Sephora is using a bot to provide beauty tips and enable direct shopping.